Peru | Pachamanca In Huaraz

 
On the left, Pachamanca with salsa de aji (chilli sauce) and a bowl of lake algae with corn.

On the left, Pachamanca with salsa de aji (chilli sauce) and a bowl of lake algae with corn.

My plate of Pachamanca was so filling that
I actually had it over three different meals!

It was Sunday lunchtime, and it had begun to drizzle as my landlady, Liliana and I walked to Jirón José Olaya. This small street transforms every Sunday to serve traditional Peruvian food - with gazebos sheltering the trestle tables and chairs on the road. You can also dine in the many restaurants serving the same dishes. It was the only street that remained standing during the 40s and 60s, and here you can take a glimpse of the old Huaraz, where the traditional green and white colour scheme of the houses remain.

Liliana told me that José Olaya (1789 – June 29, 1823) was a national hero, and with a bit of research revealed a similar story to the Philippines’ own national hero, Dr. José Rizal.

We walked down the stairs and passed the kitchen of a busy restaurant full of locals. It was Sunday, a day to spend with friends and family - that was evident as I didn’t anyone sitting on their own. A Chihuahua sat precariously on top of a plastic bag full of somethings as two women waited for their meals at a nearby table. Dogs are like an accessory here, and seeing a dog run freely in a restaurant isn’t uncommon.

 
 

There were a lot of Perúvian cuisine to choose from, but for this outing
I decided to try Pachamanca, a traditional dish cooked in an adobe brick oven with hot stones. What is in a Pachamanca? It is usually a feast to be shared: Chicken, beef and pork are wrapped in chincho leaves, served with Perúvian tamale, potato, sweet potato, green lima beans, humita (sweet treat) corn and salsa de aji (chilli sauce). Pachamanca has an earthy, aromatic flavour, which reminds of hangi in New Zealand. At 22 soles (NZ$9.90), it wasn’t cheap, but my plate of Pachamanca was so filling that I actually had it over three different meals! It’s a treat that I enjoyed and could probably have again, but maybe not until after I tick a few more off my Perúvian foodie list.


Who is RonnaEats? Ronna Funtelar runs this independent foodie blog, with a philosophy to eat and write about food we can rave about. We don't ask for free meals or collaborate with our reviewed eateries, so you can be assured the reviews are unbiased and all for the love of food. Whether it's a food truck, a hole in the wall eatery, street food, local hangout or fine dining, we want to know where to head to for our next food adventure.

 

Ronna Grace Funtelar

A thirtyish storyteller, hobby hiker, photography and sunrise enthusiast with a passion for mindfully helping others live beyond their comfort zone.