Peru | Eduardo El Brujo in Zorritos, Tumbes

 
Conchas negras (black clam) is a delicacy in the northern coast of Peru, here served with rice, chifles and salsa criolla.

Conchas negras (black clam) is a delicacy in the northern coast of Peru, here served with rice, chifles and salsa criolla.

Living in the northern Peruvian coast has had me spoiled for choice when it came to fresh seafood.
 
 
Dine outdoors and you get a beachfront dining experience.

Dine outdoors and you get a beachfront dining experience.

Eduardo El Brujo Restaurant
Location: Auxiliar Panamericana Nte. 1973, Zorritos

Eduardo El Brujo is in the outskirts of Zorritos – and the two soles it costs to go by moto is definitely worth the trip. In comparison to other local restaurants, it is on the higher end, however the portions are large and the presentation is more of what you will find in busy tourist areas. The white sands beachfront is simply breathtaking.

Canchas - traditional, toasted and salted Andean corn kernels often served with most dishes.

Canchas - traditional, toasted and salted Andean corn kernels often served with most dishes.

I had spent a month living in Zorritos, studying with TEFL Zorritos and we had our end of course lunch here. What a location! This was my first and only time dining here, and I wasn’t disappointed. I decided to try the local delicacy, conchas negras, a black clam, that is normally only available in this part of northern Peru. It was served with arroz (rice), chifles and salsa criolla. As you can see it was a fairly large portion and cost about 40 soles ($NZ18). What does it taste like? It reminded me of a cross between mussels and black abalone. I didn’t mind it, it was nice, glad to tick it off my Peruvian foodie list but personally would go out of my way to have
it again.

We had bowls of canchas while we waited for our mains. I have to say these were the best canchas I have had in Peru so far – they were light and fluffy and just the right amount of saltiness. Jess had the chicharron de calamares (fried crumbed calamari) and Amelia had the chicharron de pescado (fried crumbed fish) – I had a taste and both were delicious. The photo of the calamari tentacles is from Kassie’s dish, she wasn’t all too impressed being served with the tentacles, which is fairly common here.

A long lunch at Eduardo El Brujo was a nice way to end our course – to enjoy delicious food with a great group of people before we headed to different parts of Peru. Living in the northern Peruvian coast has had me spoiled for choice when it came to fresh seafood, it will be missed as I head to the highlands.

Local cows walking along the beach.

Local cows walking along the beach.


Who is RonnaEats? Ronna Funtelar runs this independent foodie blog, with a philosophy to eat and write about food we can rave about. We don't ask for free meals or collaborate with our reviewed eateries, so you can be assured the reviews are unbiased and all for the love of food. Whether it's a food truck, a hole in the wall eatery, street food, local hangout or fine dining, we want to know where to head to for our next food adventure.

 

Ronna Grace Funtelar

A thirtyish storyteller, hobby hiker, photography and sunrise enthusiast with a passion for mindfully helping others live beyond their comfort zone.